Research & Teaching

This course provides an overview of energy policy issues with an emphasis on the analysis necessary to frame, design, and evaluate policy remedies to energy problems. The course is intended for doctoral students interested but not necessarily specializing in energy issues.

The greatest challenge at the intersection of science, technology, and public policy in the 21st century has arisen because society is getting 80 percent of the massive quantities of energy it needs using fuels and technologies that are disrupting global climate and the array of environmental goo

The history of energy is the history of modern political economy. The history of energy is the history of a scientific concept and its technological application. The history of energy is the history of climate change and environmental catastrophe.

The future is not what it used to be.

Description: The Physical Sciences hold the key to solving unprecedented problems at the intersection of science, technology, and an array of rapidly emerging global scale challenges.

How can one optimize the benefits of environmental or social sustainability while generating a higher return on investment in buildings? Where are the opportunities for real estate initiatives that are highly functional, healthy, aesthetically pleasing and financially rewarding?

Lobbying is often called the 4th branch of government since this multi-billion dollar industry significantly impacts policymaking.

Zero energy buildings, also known as net zero energy buildings are buildings (or a community of buildings) which produce with on-site renewables the same amount of energy as they consume, on an annual basis.

The best intent does not always lead to the best performing design, as intuition and rules of thumb often fail to adequately inform decision making. Therefore, designers of high-performance architecture increasingly turn to analytical tools to eliminate some of the guesswork.

This course will showcase how novel technologies have allowed fascinating new insights into key aspects of our environment. The development of novel instrumentation, driven by technological advances, is revolutionizing the environmental sciences.

This seminar will explore a series of issues at the intersection of behavioral economics and public policy. Potential questions will involve climate change; energy efficiency; health care; and basic rights.

This seminar will explore a series of issues at the intersection of behavioral economics and public policy. Potential questions will involve climate change; energy efficiency; health care; and basic rights.

In the US, energy use creates large political and social tensions and  much emphasis is placed on climate change.  In China, health issues surrounding energy use are emerging as a critical issue.

The seminar will provide a historical perspective on the development of the Chinese economy with emphasis on the energy sector, including analysis of related environmental problems.

A solution to the problems set by the intersection of global energy demand and climate feedbacks requires the teaching of physics and chemistry in that context.

Fundamental concepts and formalisms of conservation of energy and increase of entropy as applied to natural and engineered environmental and biological systems.

Topics in electricity market design starting from the foundations of coordination for competition. Infrastructure investment, Resource Adequacy, Pricing Models, Cost Allocation, Energy Trading, Forward Hedging, Market Manipulation, Distribution Regulation, and Policy for Clean Energy Innovation.

This course offers a multidisciplinary exploration of the engineering, economic, and institutional principles involved in water system development and management. The course is divided into two parts:.

This course examines future climate change in the context of earth history, and then considers various strategies for what might be done to deal with it.

The climate of our planet is changing at a rate unprecedented in human history. Primarily responsible is the build-up of heat-trapping gases in the atmosphere, most notably carbon dioxide emitted in conjunction with the combustion of coal, oil and natural gas.  Concentrations in the atmosphere of

This course will examine future climate change in the context of Earth history, and then consider various strategies for what might be done to deal with it.

This course provides a systematic introduction to the energy system for students in engineering and applied sciences.

The course provides an overview of the energy resources that we use to sustain our global economies, and explores the impact of these activities on our environment.

The course will provide an overview of the solid state device physics and p-n junction operation necessary to understand the operation.

This course will focus on physical principles underlying semiconductor devices: electrons and holes in semiconductors, energies and bandgaps, transport properties of electrons and holes, p-n junctions, transistors, light emitting diodes, lasers, solar cells and thermoelectric devices.

Advanced Water Treatment will give students detailed instruction in emerging technologies for municipal wastewater treatment, industrial wastewater treatment, wastewater reclamation and reuse, desalination, and groundwater remediation.

Principles governing energy generation and interconversion. Current and projected world energy use. Selected important current and anticipated future technologies for energy generation, interconversion, storage, and end usage.

This course helps develop the skills to design, fund, and implement renewable energy projects in the United States and around the world.

This course is the second of a two-module sequence in Building Technology (6121, 6122) and constitutes part of the core curriculum in architecture.

Energy is the lifeblood of economic activity, and there is little prospect of this changing. However, the planet’s stores of easily accessed fossil fuels are limited, and the climatological cost of continuing to rely on fossil fuels is high.

A solution to the problems set by the intersection of global energy demand and climate feedbacks requires the teaching of physics and chemistry in that context.

The media play a unique role in shaping public understanding, policy, and political debate about controversial climate, energy, and environmental issues around the world.

Introduces students to the environmental aspects of nanoscience and nanotechnology. We will study the fundamental physical chemical properties, characterization, environmental implications, and environmental applications of nanoparticles and nanomaterials.

The climate of our planet is changing at a rate unprecedented in human history.  Primarily responsible is the build-up of heat-trapping gases in the atmosphere, most notably carbon dioxide emitted in conjunction with the combustion of coal, oil and natural gas.  Concentrations in the atmosphere o

Changing the paradigm of urban development to become healthier and more sustainable requires a common baseline understanding of principles, metrics, and decision-making tools.

On December 12, 2015, the United Nations climate talks in Paris reached a historic milestone when more than 190 countries adopted the first accord that calls on all countries to join the fight against global warming.

The Geopolitics of Energy examines the intersection between international security, politics, and energy issues.

Non-fossil energy sources and energy storage are important for our future. We cover four main subjects to which students with a background in physics and physical chemistry could make paradigm changing contributions: photovoltaic cells, nuclear power, batteries, and photosynthesis.

Principles governing energy generation and interconversion. Current and projected world energy use. Selected important current and anticipated future technologies for energy generation, interconversion, storage, and end usage.

This course will provide an introduction to environmental science and engineering through case studies of some of the most pressing environmental issues.

This course provides an introduction to the physical and chemical impacts of energy choices on human society and natural ecosystems.

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Harvard University
Center for the Environment

NEW! Address: 26 Oxford Street, 4th Floor, Cambridge
Email: huce@environment.harvard.edu
Phone: (617) 495-0368

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