Research & Teaching

Green chemistry is the design of chemical products and processes that reduce or eliminate the use and generation of hazardous substances.

Rapid human population growth and even more rapid growth in consumption are driving a transformation of most of Earth’s natural systems including its climate system, its oceans, land cover, biogeochemical cycles, biodiversity, and coastal and fresh water systems.  These systems underpin global fo

It is well-known and oft-repeated in environmental health circles that we spend 90% of time indoors.

Global Health has emerged as a distinctive field in the last two decades, replacing older conceptions of International Health, Geographic Medicine, and Tropical Medicine.

The seminar will focus on policy issues in two areas; health economics, and environmental economics. We will read papers on an assortment of policy options and formulate frameworks for analyzing their likely impacts on outcomes of interest.

According to Fortune, water promises to be to the twenty-first century what oil was to the twentieth century: the precious commodity that determines the wealth of nations. And the health of nations as well.

Our ideas about complex environmental and public health issues such as climate change, industrial chemicals, and species extinction are largely formed by simplistic and dramatized media coverage and distorting political spin from all sides.

In recent years, high performance green buildings have gone from fringe to main stream.

Policy-makers, communities, civil society, academics and business leaders around the world are increasingly concerned about the environmental and social impacts of production and consumption.Part of the response is the increasing use by industry and governments of Life Cycle Analysis (LCA), a gro

The seminars consist of student presentation of plans for collection and analysis of data, with discussion by students and faculty. Preparatory work is done under tutorial arrangements with members of the faculty.

The Making Rights Real clinic will build on a partnership between Professor White, Harvard law students, and a network of Ghanaian Human Rights / Development organizations which began in 2002.

This course will introduce students to nutrition and global health problems through exploration of demographic, epidemiological, biological, social, political, and economic determinants of nutritional status.

The seminars consist of student presentation of plans for collection and analysis of data, with discussion by students and faculty. Preparatory work is done under tutorial arrangements with members of the faculty.

This course provides a cross-disciplinary overview of environmental science and how research contributes to public policy and human health risk assessment through a case study of a global pollution issue: lead biogeochemistry.

Overview of Occupational and Environmental Medicine including: the diagnosis and management of illnesses following exposure to specific workplace substances, environmental and community hazards, such as asbestos, lead, organic solvents, and vibration; methods of diagnosis of early organ system ef

Reviews the methods used to characterize environmental and occupational exposures. Presents approaches for biologically based exposure assessment matched to epidemiologic designs. Emphasizes evaluation of scientific literature. Course Activities: Students will critique 4 case study papers.

The practicum is designed to allow Exposure, Epidemiology, and Risk (EER) Program students to integrate what they have learned and to apply this knowledge in the evaluation of a problem of importance. Each student must design and conduct an independent analysis of an environmental problem.

Human activity is changing the atmosphere and altering terrestrial and marine ecosystems on a global scale. Evidence is mounting that these changes may already be having serious effects on human health, and there is growing concern that in coming decades the effects could be catastrophic.

The course introduces students to the principles and methods used to determine whether a causal relationship exists between an agent and an adverse effect in humans and to carry out a risk assessment independently.

The multidisciplinary application of epidemiology, molecular biology and genetics, pathogenesis, drug discovery, immunology and vaccine development, and economic analysis to understanding and combating major threats to human health in developing countries.

This general microbiology course will focus on the genetics, cell biology, and physiology of microorganisms. The goal of this course is to give the students a broad overview of microbial physiology in the context of disease and environmental applications.

The connection between health, well-being, and place is a complex one with many dimensions.

Human activity is changing the atmosphere and altering terrestrial and marine ecosystems on a global scale for the first time in history.

Epigenetics is a fast growing field, with increasing applicability in environmental and epidemiology studies, focusing on the alterations in chromatin structure that can stably and heritably influence gene expression.

This course offers a comprehensive overview of gaseous and particulate air pollutants. It will emphasize pollutant sources, physical and chemical properties, sampling and analysis, chemical transformation, atmospheric transport, fate, and potential for adverse health and environmental impacts.

This course examines application of epidemiologic methods to environmental and occupational health problems.

In this course, we explore the development of our modern food production and distribution system and its effects on our environment and planet. We critically review published studies and other assessments that evaluate the environmental and social impact of food-related products and processes.

This course is designed to teach an understanding of the basic principles of water pollution and water pollution issues on local, regional and global scales. The course will begin with a discussion of the basic chemical, physical and biological properties of water and water contaminants.

Through the seminar course students will be introduced to ongoing environmental health research. They will read published articles and interview faculty.

This course is designed to provide the tools and foundations necessary to understand the fate and transport of environmental contaminants in various environmental media and to estimate their impact on human exposure.

War, disaster, drought, or famine force people to flee their land. Climate change is contributing to many of these factors.

This course surveys the scientific principles of environmental issues and environmental management practices, with attention to the health of both humans and the ecosystem.

This course is required for all incoming master of science students in GHP. It is intended as a broad survey of the main facts, issues, perspectives, methods, results, and conclusions in the areas of global population and health.

Provides students with the opportunity to review the scientific basis for the association of selected occupational and environmental exposures and disease. Special emphasis is placed on the evaluation of the epidemiologic literature, cancer, and respiratory disease.

This course offers a general introduction to environmental health from local to global, addressing fundamental topics and current controversies.

This seminar will explore a wide range of environmental and man-made neurotoxic substances and their effects on human and animal populations.

This course provides an introduction to the physical and chemical impacts of energy choices on human society and natural ecosystems.

Introduces the framework of risk assessment, considers its relationship with cost-benefit, decision analysis and other tools for improving environmental decisions. The scientific foundations for risk assessment (epidemiology, toxicology, and exposure assessment) are discussed.

This course covers applied advanced regression analysis. Its focus is on relaxing classical assumptions in regression analysis to better match what epidemiological data really looks like.

The course will assess the impact of the environment on the onset and exacerbation of cardiovascular diseases. Environmental exposures that have been implicated to impact cardiovascular disease are predominantly air pollution, second hand smoke, noise, and heat.

Starting with the fundamentals of radiation protection, this course then treats in-depth selected topics in occupational and environmental radiation protection (e.g.

Human activity is changing the atmosphere and altering terrestrial marine ecosystems on a global scale. Evidence is mounting that these changes may already be having serious effects on human health, and there is growing concern that in coming decades the effects could be catastrophic.

This course will examine methodological issues associated with the design and execution of studies designed to measure environmental exposure to chemical and biological contaminants.

The course comprises introductory lectures and discussions on key aspects of industrial hygiene and occupational health covering recognition, evaluation and control of health hazards at work.

This course is appropriate for students interested in learning quantitative methods for assessing environmental exposures and hazards.

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Harvard University
Center for the Environment

NEW! Address: 26 Oxford Street, 4th Floor, Cambridge
Email: huce@environment.harvard.edu
Phone: (617) 495-0368

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