Research & Teaching

How can one optimize the benefits of environmental or social sustainability while generating a higher return on investment in buildings? Where are the opportunities for real estate initiatives that are highly functional, healthy, aesthetically pleasing and financially rewarding?

Climate change, urbanization, and conflict mean that global disasters are on the rise.  How should the world respond when disasters force people from their homes?  How can we better help the world’s refugees?  This course examines the past, present, and future of the international humanitarian re

Why do some human beings step forward to defend the non-human?

This course will be of interest to students who would like to investigate business solutions to three of the major problems of our time: rapid and massive urbanization; increasing scarcity of clean water, clean air, clean power, and effective transport; and the apparent inability of federal gover

Growing income inequality, poor or declining educational systems, unequal access to affordable health care and the fear of continuing economic distress are putting stress on political systems worldwide and challenging the credibility of business.

The world faces challenges stemming from rapid urbanization, increasing pressure on the environment and on basic resources, and the growing difficulty governments face in managing the confluence of these trends.

This seminar introduces students to the major contributions of the field of science and technology studies (STS) to the understanding of politics and policymaking in democratic societies.

Our interactions with the natural world are increasingly mediated through changes in technology. Technologies create risks, generate solutions, reshape the environment, and alter our perception of the boundaries between nature and artifice.

The Making Rights Real clinic will build on a partnership between Professor White, Harvard law students, and a network of Ghanaian Human Rights / Development organizations which began in 2002.

This course explores specific principles from cognitive science that have important implications for instructional approach and curriculum design.

This course examines the political challenges posed by global warming from both an empirical and a normative perspective.

Explores contemporary understandings and practical implications of the idea of sustainable development.

This seminar introduces students to the major contributions of the field of science and technology studies (STS) to the analysis of politics and policymaking in democratic societies.

North America as an evolving visual environment is analyzed as a systems concatenation involving such constituent elements as farms, small towns, shopping malls, highways, suburbs, and as depicted in fiction, poetry, cartography, television, cinema, and advertising and cybernetic simulation.

Introduces the fundamental statistical and mapping tools needed for analysis of environmental systems.

Participants discuss recent research in environmental and natural resource economics and present their own work in progress. Students must complete both parts of this course (parts A&B) within the same academic year in order to receive credit.

Provides a survey, from the perspective of economics, of environmental and natural resource policy. Combines lectures on conceptual and methodological topics with examinations of public policy issues. 


An interdisciplinary exploration of Darwin’s ideas and their impact on science and society. The course links the history of Darwin’s ideas with the key features of modern evolutionary biology.

The field of industrial ecology includes advanced tools and methods to assist practitioners seeking to redesign and realign industrial systems and activities to be more ecologically and socially sound.

This course is required for all incoming master of science students in GHP. It is intended as a broad survey of the main facts, issues, perspectives, methods, results, and conclusions in the areas of global population and health.

This is an advanced research seminar on selected topics in environmental and resource economics. Emphasizes theoretical models, quantitative empirical analysis, and public policy applications. Includes presentations by invited outside speakers.

Provides a survey, from the perspective of economics, of public policy issues associated with environmental protection and natural resources management.

Introduces students to international history through the study of commodities ranging from oil, coal, and cotton to potatoes, rum, coffee, and sugar.

This seminar will use mapping as a methodological technique to examine social and environmental issues. Students will be expected to use mapping software to examine spatial data for a location and topic of their choice for their final paper.

An introduction to the history, organization, goals, and ideals of environmental protection in America.

Selected topics in environmental and resource economics. Emphasizes theoretical models, quantitative empirical analysis, and public policy applications. Includes invited outside speakers.​

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Harvard University
Center for the Environment

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Email: huce@environment.harvard.edu
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