Research & Teaching

What is the relationship between the natural environment and the design of successful places? How do we know? And how can we mobilize these ideas as planners and citizens?

This course will provide students with an understanding of water that will inform their professional approaches to landscape architecture, architecture, and planning, and contribute to protecting, improving, restoring, and sustaining water resources.

Wildlife, vegetation, soil, air, water, and aquatic ecosystems, together with their human uses, are related to the distinctive, especially spatial, attributes of suburban and urban landscapes.

This course is the first of a two-module sequence in Building Technology (6121, 6122) and constitutes part of the core curriculum in architecture.

Developing and implementing good solutions to real problems facing human society requires a broad understanding of the relationships between technology innovation, science, manufacturing, design thinking, environment, sustainability, culture, aesthetics, business, public policy, and government.

Developing and implementing good solutions to real problems facing human society requires a broad understanding of the relationships between technology innovation, science, manufacturing, design thinking, environment, sustainability, culture, aesthetics, business, public policy, and government.

This project-based class focuses on the planning and design of sustainable strategies for cities in the developing world, using the city of Hermosillo in northern Mexico as the basis for analysis and action.

Discussions on the contemporary city often focus on the challenges of large metropolitan areas.

GIS is not just for mapping. As an information system and science, it also provides tools and perspectives for learning what spatial data can tell us about the world and its geography.

This course introduces the concepts and components of a geographic information system (GIS). It also teaches the essential skills of spatial data management, analysis, and visualization through the use of the ArcGIS software package.

In recent years, high-performance green buildings have gone from fringe to mainstream.

This course introduces the basic principles of tourism master planning, enabling students to learn how communities, governments, business, and civil society can take a more inclusive and sustainable approach to planning tourism destinations worldwide.

As urbanization and internal migration to existing cities has been on the increase, residential high-rise typology became the norm in many countries.

Urban infrastructures are socio-technical systems of facilities and services (i.e. energy, telecommunications, transportation, water, waste management, food distribution, housing) vital to the basic functioning of cities and regions.

Confronting the reality of environmental degradation requires more than remote sensing, statistical analysis or institutional restructuring. As images of the changing planet become emblematic of our time, designers are responding with a scrutiny towards amplified scales and extreme events.

Through the lens of climate change, this foundation course surveys the intellectual development of resilience and adaptation in the social, natural and applied sciences.

Landscape architecture projects, at all scales, can involve elements which add to our natural resources.  These restored areas are increasingly shown to provide ?ecological services,?

How can one optimize the benefits of environmental or social sustainability while generating a higher return on investment in buildings? Where are the opportunities for real estate initiatives that are highly functional, healthy, aesthetically pleasing and financially rewarding?

The primary focus of GSD 6125 is the study of ecological considerations in architectural design. These considerations include the thermal, luminous, and acoustic behavior of buildings.

The Envision tool for sustainable infrastructure can be used for infrastructure projects of all types, sizes, complexities, and locations to assist the project team achieve higher levels of sustainability.

Zero energy buildings, also known as net zero energy buildings are buildings (or a community of buildings) which produce with on-site renewables the same amount of energy as they consume, on an annual basis.

This course provides extensive background on the history of ecotourism, its role in the development of local economies, its connection to the global tourism trade, its role in the conservation of natural resources, and its context in key case study regions including Central America, Southern Afri

“We shape our buildings, and afterwards, our buildings shape us.” ~ Winston Churchill

This introductory course surveys the historical foundations, economic logics and underlying physics that underscore the design, development and operations of sustainable buildings.

The best intent does not always lead to the best performing design, as intuition and rules of thumb often fail to adequately inform decision making. Therefore, designers of high-performance architecture increasingly turn to analytical tools to eliminate some of the guesswork.

Responding to contemporary urban patterns, ecological pressures and decaying infrastructures, this course brings together a series of influential thinkers and researchers from the design commons across North America to discuss different methods, models and measures of large scale, long range desi

It is well-known and oft-repeated in environmental health circles that we spend 90% of time indoors.

The world faces challenges stemming from rapid urbanization, increasing pressure on the environment and on basic resources, and the growing difficulty governments face in managing the confluence of these trends.

Extraction redefines our understanding of urbanism in the 21st century. If everything we build comes from the ground, then extraction is the process and practice that reshapes our assumptions about urban economies.

Provides an overview of the issues involved in transportation policy and planning, as well as an introduction to the skills necessary for solving the various analytic and managerial problems that are peculiar to this area.

Provides an overview of the issues involved in transportation policy and planning, as well as an introduction to the skills necessary for solving the various analytic and managerial problems that are peculiar to this area.

As a scarce and necessary resource, land triggers competition and conflict over possession, use, development, and preservation. For privately owned land, the market manages much of the competition.

This research seminar is intended for Master in Design Studies (MDES) candidates entering the Urbanism, Landscape, Ecology (ULE) stream as well as Master in Landscape Architecture candidates entering the post-professional (MLA II) Program.

Selected topics in the history of the North American coastal zone, including the seashore as wilderness, as industrial site, as area of recreation, and as artistic subject; the shape of coastal landscape for conflicting uses over time; and the perception of the seashore as marginal zone in litera

The environment is the milieu in which designers and planners operate. It is a messy world of facts, meanings, relations and actions that calls them to intervene - i.e., to make a plan, solve a problem, create a product, or strategize a process.

This course offers a multidisciplinary exploration of the engineering, economic, and institutional principles involved in water system development and management. The course is divided into two parts:.

This is an advanced sustainable design course with technical content that focuses on energy use reduction in existing buildings. Students learn to perform American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Level II Energy Audits.

North America as an evolving visual environment is analyzed as a systems concatenation involving such constituent elements as farms, small towns, shopping malls, highways, suburbs, and as depicted in fiction, poetry, cartography, television, cinema, and advertising and cybernetic simulation.

The connection between health, well-being, and place is a complex one with many dimensions.

This course is the second of a two-module sequence in Building Technology (6121, 6122) and constitutes part of the core curriculum in architecture.

North America as an evolving visual environment is analyzed as a systems concatenation involving such constituent elements as farms, small towns, shopping malls, highways, suburbs, and as depicted in fiction, poetry, cartography, television, cinema, and advertising and cybernetic simulation.

Changing the paradigm of urban development to become healthier and more sustainable requires a common baseline understanding of principles, metrics, and decision-making tools.

This course will examine natural and anthropogenic processes affecting the coastal zone and nearshore environment. Ecological principles and their application to design and planning will be emphasized.

Recognizing that plants are one of the essential mediums of landscape architecture, this class seeks to introduce the student to two basic relationships; the relationship between plants and people (horticulture) and the relationship between plants and the environment (ecology).

Selected topics in the history of the North American coastal zone, including the seashore as wilderness, as industrial site, as area of recreation, and as artistic subject; the shape of coastal landscape for conflicting uses over time; and the perception of the seashore as marginal zone in litera

There are no results for this search. Please try to widen your search criteria in the filter.

Harvard University
Center for the Environment

NEW! Address: 26 Oxford Street, 4th Floor, Cambridge
Email: huce@environment.harvard.edu
Phone: (617) 495-0368

Connect with us

Follow HUCE to stay updated on energy and the environment at Harvard and beyond.

Subscribe to our mailing list