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We will discuss the "food turn" in anthropology through reading contemporary (and classic) ethnographies of food in contexts of production, distribution, social exchange, gender, and science. Note: Undergraduates encouraged to participate. Instructor’s permission required.Note: Expected to be...
This course builds on API-101 to develop microeconomic tools of analysis for policy problems through various policy applications. The course is broadly focused on evaluating the rationale for government intervention in the economy and evaluating the efficiency, incentive, and distributional...
Provides a survey, from the perspective of economics, of public policy issues associated with environmental protection and natural resources management. Lectures on conceptual and methodological topics are combined with examinations of specific resource and environmental issues, with particular...
Benefit-cost analysis is a widely used set of tools for evaluating alternative policies and specific projects. This module covers the basic components of such analysis, including estimating impacts, valuing outcomes using market prices, valuing outcomes (such as environmental quality, health, and...
This course provides an overview of energy policy issues with an emphasis on the supporting analysis needed to address the problems. The course is intended for doctoral students interested but not necessarily specializing in energy issues. The course is offered in support of the Harvard University...
This is an advanced research seminar on selected topics in environmental and resource economics. Emphasizes theoretical models, quantitative empirical analysis, and public policy applications. Includes presentations by invited outside speakers. Students prepare critiques of presented papers and...
Deals with public and private management of an industry sector that encompasses half the world’s labor force, half the world’s assets, and 40% of consumer purchases. The public policy issues of economic development, trade, nutrition, food safety, the environment, maintaining limited natural...
The oceans contain 97 percent of the Earth's water, and host the most disparate ecosystems on the planet. This course provides an introduction to deep sea ocean habitats, animals, and microorganisms. Emphasis is placed on the physiological adaptations of organisms to their environment, as well as...
Trees both provide a background in our landscape and play an important role in the ecosystems of the world. This course explores topics related to the growth patterns of trees, their physiology, and their identification. Basic concepts in ecosystem dynamics and forestry practices are discussed....
How do anthropogenic-driven events affect the structure and function of marine communities? In this seminar, we focus on the fragility and resilience of marine systems in the face of perturbations such as habitat fragmentation, elevated sea surface temperature, introduction of alien species, non-...
Without the heat, light, and mobility provided by suppliers of energy, firms, governments, and individuals could not function. Energy prices are often highly volatile, and energy firms are subject to pervasive government intervention, especially when the energy value chain crosses international...
This course explores advanced and emerging topics in business, energy, and the environment. There is a focus on opportunities for firms whose offerings are significantly involved in or impacted by energy, water, resource efficiency, transportation, and conservation. The course is team taught in...
Students who are interested in business opportunities and societal issues relating to rapid urbanization, increasing resource scarcity, and apparent inability of federal governments to respond to these challenges are the target audience for this course. The class takes the point of view of...
This course will appeal to students who want to understand issues and potential action with respect to rapid global urbanization, tensions and tradeoffs in the energy-water-food nexus, innovation in both infrastructure and resource optimization, and the future of cities and the built environment....
The course will provide a survey of the global food and agribusiness system. In addition to studying the management problems of farmers, processors, branded consumer goods manufacturers and food retailers, we will consider consumer trends, technological advances, public policy issues, food safety...
OverviewThis course combines a classroom experience with an independent project to explore advanced and emerging topics in business, energy, and the environment. There is a focus on opportunities for organizations whose offerings are significantly involved in or impacted by energy, water, resource...
The science of ecology purports to study life as the sum of interactions between organisms and their natural environment. The term 'natural' has in recent decades undergone significant revision, in both biological and philosophical circles, increasingly to include a great many aspects of human...
Origin, evolution, dispersal, paleoecology, and geologic history of the major groups of the plant kingdom. Laboratory study of representative groups, living and fossil.Note: Expected to be given in 2014-15. EPS 107 is also offered as OEB 107. Students may not take both EPS 107 and OEB 107 for...
An overview of the Earth's energy and material resources. Following introductions to hydrocarbons, nuclear fuels, and other economically important ores, the course emphasizes methods used to exploit these resources and the environmental impacts of these operations. Topics include: coal and acid...
Basic observations and theoretical understanding of ocean phenomena from local surface beach waves to the effects of the oceans on global climate. Observations and dynamics of ocean waves, currents, turbulence, temperature and salinity distributions; basic fluid dynamics equations; the ocean’s...
Prerequisite: Mathematics 21 or Applied Mathematics 21a or 21b, Physics 11 or 15, or permission of instructor. Physical concepts necessary to understand atmospheric structure and motion. Phenomena studied include the formation of clouds and precipitation, solar and terrestrial radiation, dynamical...
Physical and chemical processes determining the composition of the atmosphere and its implications for climate, ecosystems, and human welfare. Origin of the atmosphere. Nitrogen, oxygen, carbon, sulfur, trace metal cycles. Climate and the greenhouse effect. Atmospheric transport and turbulence....
The atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration is now the highest it has been in at least 800,000 years, raising concerns regarding possible future climate changes. This seminar will survey the science of global change from the perspective of scientific debates within climate community. Specifically...
A solution to the problems set by the intersection of global energy demand and climate feedbacks requires the teaching of physics and chemistry in that context. Core topics include thermodynamics, free energy, entropy, acid-base and oxidation-reduction reactions, electrochemistry, electromagnetic...
Introduction to the physical processes governing the large-scale circulation of the ocean. Emphasis on time-changing components, observational methods used, and a survey of basic methods of analysis and theory. Topics include sea level rise, oceanic heat transport changes, and smaller-scale...
Study of water as a critical resource and as a factor in Earth surface and near-surface processes. Focus on development of relevant mechanics and physics. Hydrologic cycle, surface and groundwater, evapotranspiration, soil physics. Flow in porous media, Darcy law, contaminant transport,...
A focused inquiry on the interactions of life and environment through geologic history. In 2009 we will focus on the Paleozoic record, including the cambrian explosion, Ordovician radiation, and Paleozoic diversity drops.Note: Given in alternate years.Prerequisite: EPS 8, OEB 10; or permission of...
Techniques in interpreting paleo-environmental information from sedimentary rocks, covering grain-flow, alluvial fans, siliciclastic shelves, carbonates, glacial deposits, and deep-sea environments, and culminating with cyclo-stratigraphy and basin dynamics.Note: Expected to be given in 2014-15.
An introduction to low temperature biogeochemistry. We will focus on key biogeochemical elements and look to understand the linkages between the biosphere, atmosphere and hydrosphere. The course begins with a description of marine geochemistry (alkalinity and chemical fluxes) and works toward...
Introduction to biological and organic chemistry of the Earth’s environment. Primary focus on formation, processing, and preservation of organic carbon, with emphasis on paleoenvironmental applications and on processes occurring at the molecular level. This class is intended to be taken in series...
Introduction to geobiological research methods: We will learn low temperature geochemical techniques, light stable isotope mass-spectrometry, and other microbiology methods commonly used in geobiological research. The focus will be on the cycling of biogeochemical elements (O, C, S, and Fe) in...
Atmospheric physics and chemistry: stratospheric and tropospheric transport, photochemistry, and aerosols; stratospheric ozone loss, tropospheric pollution; biogeochemical cycles. Note: Students specializing in this area are expected to take EPS 200 and 236. These courses may serve as an...
Introduction to the mechanics of fluids and solids, organized around earth and environmental phenomena. Conservation laws, stress, deformation and flow. Inviscid fluids and ocean gravity waves; Coriolis dominated large scale flows. Viscosity and groundwater seepage; convective cells; boundary...
Topics in low-temperature geochemistry, oceanography, and climatology will be discussed. Students will read and present journal articles on relevant topics, and will rotate responsibility for leading discussions. Note: Given in alternate years. Expected to be given in 2014-15.
Overview of the basic features of the climate system (global energy balance, atmospheric general circulation, ocean circulation, and climate variability) and the underlying physical processes.Prerequisite: Applied Mathematics 105b (may be taken concurrently), Physics 11a, b, or 15; or permission...
The course emphasizes the principles of isotope and trace element geochemistry and their application to relevant problems in Earth and Planetary Sciences. Problems to be addressed include planet formation and differentiation, ocean chemistry, and climate reconstruction.

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  • [Course titles in brackets] indicate that the course is not scheduled to be taught during the 2014-2015 academic year, but may be offered in an alternate year.
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