Fall

FRSEMR 52L. Life and Death Lessons from the Fossil Record

Semester: 

N/A
  • Professor: Javier Ortega-Hernandez
  • Term: Fall
  • Day: Th
  • Time: 9:00-11:15AM
  • School: Faculty of Arts and Sciences
  • Course ID: 218480
  • Subject Area: Freshman Seminar

The fossil record offers a unique perspective on the history of Life on Earth. Although palaeontology might remind us of grotesque bones, dusty museum cabinets, and quirky scientists who relish both of those things—or God forbid, Ross Geller from Friends­—the knowledge derived from...

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HLS 2359: Food Law and Policy

Semester: 

N/A
  • Professor: Emily Broad Leib
  • Term: Spring, Fall
  • Day: T
  • Time: 1:45-3:45PM
  • Course ID: 213839

 

This seminar will present an overview of topics in food law and policy, and will examine how these laws shape what we eat. In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to a range of issues impacting the food system from farm to fork to landfill. In the past few years, major news stories have covered the U.S. farm bill, labeling of genetically engineered food products, soda taxes...

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ENGLISH 102E. Introduction to Old English: Landscape, Seascape, and Early Ecologies

Semester: 

Fall
  • Professor: Daniel Donoghue
  • Term: Fall
  • Day: T, Th
  • Time: 10:30-11:45AM
  • School: Faculty of Arts and Sciences
  • Course ID: 121946

How did people inhabit and view their physical environment in early medieval England? Was it life-sustaining or threatening? What was the balance between managing resources and exploiting them? How did poets and farmers, kings and saints invoke images of land and sea as meaningful symbols? The Old English literature on such questions, which is diverse and engaging,...

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OEB 155R. Biology of Insects

Semester: 

Fall
  • Professor: Naomi Pierce
  • Term: Fall
  • Day: W
  • Time: 1:30-2:45PM
  • School: Faculty of Arts and Sciences
  • Course ID: 142688

An introduction to the major groups of insects. The life history, morphology, physiology, and ecology of the main taxa are examined through a combination of lecture, lab, and field exercises. Topics include the phylogeny of terrestrial...

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OEB 65. Conservation Biology

Semester: 

Fall
  • Professor: Javier Ortega-Hernandez
  • Term: Fall
  • Day: M, W
  • Time: 3:00-4:15PM
  • School: Faculty of Arts and Sciences
  • Course ID: 218751
  • Subject Area: Organismic & Evolutionary Biology

Our planet and its biodiversity are in peril. We will begin by exploring the state of the planet and how we got here before focusing on what can still be done to conserve Earth’s remaining biodiversity, considering the biological, societal and ethical considerations of conservation in a changing...

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GENED 1001. Stories from the End of the World

Semester: 

Fall
  • Professor: Giovanni Bazzana
  • Term: Fall
  • Day: T, Th
  • Time: 9:00-10:15AM
  • School: Faculty of Arts and Sciences
  • Course ID: 212765
  • Subject Area: Freshman Seminar

Humans seem to have always imagined the end of their world order. It appears that, without the “sense of an ending,” not only artistic production, but also individual and social lives cannot be made coherent and effective. Fantasizing about the apocalypse is something that many people in the US and almost everywhere else...

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EXPOS 20 251. Expository Writing 20: What Do We Talk About When We Talk About Climate Change?

Semester: 

Fall
  • Professor: Eliza Holmes
  • Term: Fall
  • Day: Th
  • Time: 3:00-4:15PM
  • School: Faculty of Arts and Sciences
  • Course ID: 116353
  • Subject Area: Freshman Seminar

This class will explore how to write, think, and talk about the complexities of global climate change. We are living in a moment where the reality of massive, human-made global climate change has become unavoidable. In the face of our changing plane--the loss of ordinary seasons, bugs, expected weather, known landmarks--language...

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